It’s the holidays, and I want to write!

My muse has a very strange sense of timing. I’m trying to finish edits on a completed manuscript. There is the piece I started for NaNoWritMo tugging at me to work on it and WHAM out of left field the opening I’ve been searching for on another work-in-progress comes out of left field and wants to be written RIGHT NOW!

Okay, well let’s see. Christmas Eve is upon us. My house will be full of guests. And you want me to write? Now? Blank stare.  Where in the devil were you in November when my Nano stalled because I was sick. There was no inspiration or muse around then. Why is it these wonderful, exciting dances with inspiration always hit when I’m too busy to make it to the keyboard.  In this case, I’m going to have my two year old granddaughter. Ever try to write with a two year old about? Oh yeah, great gobs of fun. “Sweetheart, what are you doing?”  “Nothing.”  Right.

So tomorrow, I will be chasing a pixie princess. There are party trays to make and baking to finish. And the entire time a story will be spinning in my head with no where to go. All I can say is, at least I won’t be bored. 

How do you handle ill timed inspiration?

~Make it your Best~

You only get one chance for a good first impression

 Before submitting your manuscript do some simple things to make sure it’s your best work. 

`Run your word processor’s Spell/Grammar check – this is by no means the best way to edit, at the same time you’ll be surprised just how much it catches. Have a trusted friend (preferably another writer) proof your work.

`Grammar does count. Publishers do employ editors. They are not there to police your use of commas or find your dangling participles.

`Send the cleanest manuscript you can present. Examine your work for lazy, unnecessary, or repetitive words. ‘That’ is one which invades a novel without the writer noticing.

Also look for where you can delete unnecessary descriptors. ‘She sat back down glaring at me.’ ‘She glared at me as she sat.’ 

Every line of dialog doesn’t require a tag (said, answered, etc). Show the emotion in the lead sentence and you don’t have to explain. Simple is better. Use said.

Examine your sentence structure. Look for diversity. Are you starting your sentences with ‘ing’ or ‘ly’ words too much? How many begin with he, she, character names or the?

Are your sentences too long with endless connectors? Or do you have a rash of sentence fragments which should be put together?

The right word – No spell check program will catch these errors consistently. As a writer it is your job to make sure you’ve got the right usage. 

Their – They’re  

Your – You’re

To – Too  

Complement – Compliment 

People ‘lie’ Things ‘lay’

`Does it start in the right place? As the author you need to know everything about your characters, all of the history which makes them act the way they do. The reader often doesn’t need to know or it can be worked into conversation as the story unfolds.

`Start the story where the action begins. Giving the reader pages of back story can put them off and you want to grab them from the first paragraph.

`Too much information, information dumps, are common and at times necessary. Examine these to see if they can be presented in conversion or action. If it isn’t necessary to move the story forward consider cutting it. Paragraphs of back and side stories can become tedious and put your reader off.

`Consistent point of view (pov). Every character does not need to have their pov shared with the reader. Give pov to your lead characters because what they know, see and think propel the story. Avoid jumping from one character to another every other paragraph. It can be confusing for the reader.

`Show, don’t tell: 

Troy saw a dog cross the road. 

Motion caught Troy’s attention. A scruffy, brown dog loped across the dusty road and into the trees as if he owned them.

`Writing is a process of constant learning. Be willing to listen to comments without getting defensive. If you’re still protective of your work, get over it or wait until you do. Submitting to Agents and Publishers can be a brutal business. A writer needs to develop a pretty tough skin.

The Critique

I always find critiques interesting.

When the reader and author don’t know each other it can be taken as snarky or insincere.

When the reader knows the author, well that can get down right interesting.

You can hurt a strangers feelings and not feel too bad, but someone you know?

This is where the rubber meets the road. I picked people I knew would suck it up and tell me ‘It’s trash’ to read my early work. And they did too. I found knowing them a help. These people had a vested interest in me and they risked upsetting me. THANK YOU..this is how we grow as writers.

I’m not above injury, but when I put something out there for critique that’s what I want. How horrifying it would be to query crap and never get called on it.  Friends tell friends when it’s bad. Are you a friend or an acquaintance?

I always wonder at the would-be-contestants for American Idol. It is obvious, even to me, some of these people can’t sing. Doesn’t anyone care enough to tell them? “Darling I love you. You will only embarrass yourself.” Dang.

Throwing flowery words around is good for the ego, but little else.

Is it too wordy? Too lean? Confusing? Or can’t string a good sentence together bad?

If an author isn’t ready to hear the answers, they aren’t ready for the world to see their work.

I don’t want anyone blowing sunshine up my skirt.

How do you feel about it?

What’s really going through your head as you read articles looking for a scrap of good to say?

If you have to explain, it’s not working.

I’m in the front row these days, having recently been published through Second Wind Publishing LLC.

This far from gets me off the target of critique. If anything it rather makes my work a bull’s eye. I’ve gotten my share of comments, complaints and suggestions. I decided very early to consider each of them carefully and do my best not to get defensive. 

Listening and carefully filtering what other people have to say has made me a better writer.

I note some aspiring authors want to argue with readers, instead of asking why it’s confusing, not well executed. 

When an aspiring author posts parts of their writing to a social board or blog, they should expect readers to express their opinion. They are giving their time to your unpublished work, and as such should be treated with respect. Telling the reader they are wrong, or that it is explained in the next chapter isn’t respectful. 

When you go into a bookstore is the author of every book standing next to their displays? No, and you won’t be either.

If you don’t catch a reader in the first paragraph, it doesn’t matter how brilliant the rest of the book is. They will put it back on the shelf and move on until one does capture their attention.

Should you listen to every criticism? Of course not, you’d go crazy trying to make everyone happy..it can’t be done.  When the same comment is repeatedly being made, give it consideration.  Could that many readers have simply misunderstood your intent? Or as an author did you fail to convey it properly?

Social sites and contests are a great place to learn. Take advantage of the reader’s observations, and learn from them. Writing is a solitary occupation. Sharing your work is not.